Blackface with Ayanna Thompson

After a breathtaking episode on Othello last season, Ayanna Thompson is back to talk about her book, Blackface, which is part of our Object Lessons series. In this episode, we discuss the events that drove Ayanna to write this book, the history of Blackface up to the 21st century, how media weaponizes the notion of white innocence in contemporary examples of Blackface, and much more.

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Yasodhara and the Buddha with Vanessa R. Sasson, Part One

Vanessa R. Sasson is Professor of Religious Studies in the Liberal and Creative Arts Department of Marianopolis College, Canada and the author of Yasodhara and the Buddha, which we discuss in this episode. For those who do not know Yasodhara, this largely forgotten woman was once married to the Buddha. In part one of this episode, we discuss Yasodhara’s rich, intricate story, as well as the research process behind the book. We also delve into why Vanessa felt compelled to write this book as a “western woman” and how that position affects the context of her modern storytelling. 

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The War On Disabled People with Ellen Clifford, Part Two

This is part two of our episode on The War on Disabled People. We are continuing our conversation with Ellen Clifford, a disabled activist who has worked within the disability sector for over twenty years and is a current member of the National Steering Group for Disabled People Against Cuts. In this episode, Ellen unpacks the ways in which people with disabilities are made to feel invisible, how austerity reversed progress for disability rights, the future of disability rights and how to break the cycle of inaccessibility, and much more. Take a listen.

The War on Disabled People book cover

The War on Disabled People with Ellen Clifford, Part One

In 2016, a United Nations report found the UK government responsible for ‘grave and systematic violations’ of disabled people’s rights. Ellen Clifford, a disabled activist, has been at the heart of the resistance against the war on disabled people for over twenty years. 

In part one of this episode, we’ll unpack the history surrounding the war on disabled people; the relationship between disability and capitalism, and how covid-19 has exacerbated the violent conditions of the austerity state.

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Hip Hop Architecture with Sekou Cooke, Part Two

As architecture grapples with its own racist legacy, Hip-Hop Architecture outlines a powerful new manifesto-the voice of the underrepresented, marginalized, and voiceless within the discipline. In part two of this episode, we discuss Sekou’s now finished exhibit at the MoMA, how the transformation of public spaces has been used to displace marginalized communities, architecture’s response to social justice movements like Black Lives Matter, Sekou’s ultimate “desert island” hip-hop track, and much more. 

Hip-Hop Architecture book cover

Hip-Hop Architecture with Sekou Cooke, Part One

As architecture grapples with its own racist legacy, Hip-Hop Architecture outlines a powerful new manifesto-the voice of the underrepresented, marginalized, and voiceless within the discipline. In part one of this episode, we discuss the production of spaces, buildings, and urban environments that embody the creative energies in hip-hop, as well as the expanding design philosophy which which uses hip-hop as a lens through which to provoke new architectural ideas.

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A History of Private Policing in the United States with Bill Miller, Part Two

In part two of this episode, Bill Miller, author of A History of Private Policing in the United States, discusses the history of privatization in the police force, and how, in tandem with the US military and prison system, it has served as a major component of authority in America as an auxiliary of the state. Our conversation covers everything from gun violence, the role of police in suppressing the American labor movement in the 60s, and the current campaign to defund the police.

A History of Private Policing in the United States book cover

A History of Private Policing in the United States with Bill Miller, Part One

In part one of this episode, Bill Miller, author of A History of Private Policing in the United States, discusses the history of privatization in the police force, and how, in tandem with the US military and prison system, it has served as a major component of authority in America as an auxiliary of the state. Our conversation covers everything from gun violence, the role of police in suppressing the American labor movement in the 60s, and the current campaign to defund the police.

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Back to Black with Kehinde Andrews, Part Two

Back to Black seeks to show us the long, powerful and painful history of Black radical politics. Born out of resistance to slavery and colonialism, its rich past encompasses figures such as Marcus Garvey, Angela Davis, the Black Panthers and the Black Lives Matter activists of today. In part two of this episode, we discuss systemic racism in academia, the future of the Black Lives Matter movement, and much more.